Welcome to Dickey McCay Insurance Agency in Tellico Plains, Tennessee. Our office is located at 905 Veterans Memorial Dr., which is about one hour south of Knoxville, Tennessee and one hour north of Chattanooga, Tennessee in an area which has been selected as one of the top ten most beautiful towns in Tennessee.

Tellico Plains is a mountain town in East Tennessee known for being the gateway to the Cherohala Skyway and the Cherokee National Forest. Here among the foothills of the Smoky Mountains, life is peaceful, scenic views are picturesque, and endless years of outdoor activities to explore with family and friends. To learn more about our rich heritage, read about the History of Tellico, Plains as the Dickey McCay team has collaborated and shared some interesting information from knowledge gained locally, Charles Hall Museum, and others. Kent Mathews, Charles Hall’s son-in-law, works in the Dickey McCay Insurance Tellico Plains office, so if you enjoy learning little about the heritage of our town before you explore what we can do for your auto, homeowners, life, health, commercial or personal insurance needs, look for the “History of Tellico Plains” header below. Don’t forget, our experience and passion for insurance resembles the feeling we have for our town and people, so stop by or give us a call as we can provide you a value-added package of insurance services to meet your individual or commercial needs.

At Dickey McCay Insurance, we work to provide you the safety and security you need to enjoy life. We carry over 35 different Insurance Carriers who offer comprehensive and value-added services for auto insurance (car insurance), health insurance, life insurance, rental insurance, group health insurance, homeowner’s insurance, cyber insurance for commercial businesses, and workers compensation insurance just to name a few as the list goes on. Our team of certified professionals have over eighty (80) years of combined knowledge and experience in the insurance industry, so let us listen and help you find the right insurance carrier and package to suit your insurance situation. For example, we have an excellent carrier for Rental Property Insurance and Vacation Rental Insurance, so you need to call us today to take advantage of the great pricing we have available on these insurance products as well as others.

Call us or stop by today as we are waiting to help and build new relationships as we are in the people business.

History of Tellico Plains, Tennessee

The area along the Tellico River was inhabited for thousands of years by indigenous peoples like the Creek and Cherokee. The Unicoi Trail was a footpath used by the Indians for trade, communication, warfare and transportation (a 2 ½ mile section has been restored for public use and hiking.) Early settlers, mainly Scots and Irish, came to Tellico Plains via trading routes from North Carolina and Virginia. Whites and Cherokees skirmished for decades. Finally the Indian Removal Bill was pushed through Congress and thousands of Cherokee were removed to Oklahoma during the infamous 1838 Trail of Tears.

During the Civil War, the state was the last to secede from the Union. East Tennessee voted 2 to 1 in favor of remaining with the Union. Some say the soldiers joined either side of the battle, depending on who would pay more. During the Civil War, the Tellico Iron Works provided munitions for the Confederacy: it was destroyed by General Sherman late in 1863. From the 1820s well into the 20th century, industrial development by Tellico Iron Works, Tellico Extract Co., Tellico Cotton Mill, Babcock Lumber and Stokely Canning Company occurred. The railroad benefited from these companies and a line was built from Athens eastward with the first train arriving in Tellico Plains in 1888. Trains brought coal into town and the mail went in and out on the train. Passenger service continued into Tellico Plains until August 1953 and freight service was discontinued in 1983.

The town of Tellico Plains, Tennessee was incorporated July 4, 1911

During the 1930s the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was established to employ young men in conservation projects. The Tellico Plains Corps constructed 8 camps employing up to 200 men. The men trimmed miles of trails through the Cherokee National Forest including 65 miles of truck trails, motorways and four bridges. The also created 16 miles of foot trails, making the forest accessible to forest fire crews.

During World War II, a POW camp was opened on Bank Street where the Community Center and fire station now sit. They housed more than 200 German prisoners, who worked on farms, cut pulpwood and worked a number of other jobs locally, guarded by US solders. The camp closed September 30, 1945.

Charles Hall (1924 – 2014). Mr. Hall was mayor of Tellico Plains for a total of 33 years, 1951 – 1955 and again 1963 – 1990. He owned and operated the Tellico Telephone Company from 1954 – 1985 and was a member of the town’s fire department for 52 years. He and his wife, Billie, led many projects that have developed this area. Mr. Hall was involved with the Kiwanis Club during the 1958 Wagontrain, which was started to show the need for a road from Tellico Plains to Robinsville, NC. For 49 years he was either the wagonmaster or chief scout. The Wagontrain ended in 1996 when the Cherohala Skyway was completed.

The Charles Hall Museum was created by Mr. Hall and is a museum and gift shop housing more than 200 guns, and extensive telephone collection and an impressive coin collection. There is an extensive collection of historical photos of the area as well as antiques and collectibles from centuries past. Admission to the museum is free as proceeds from gift shop purchases keep the doors open.

Tellico Plains is called the Gateway to the Cherokee National Forest. The area offers camping, hiking, kayaking, fishing, cycling, gold panning, waterfalls, history and the arts. Check out Indian Boundary campground, Bald River Falls, the “Dragon”, Hwy 129 which is a mecca for motorcycle riders and Cherohala Skyway for breathtaking mountain scenery.

Visit once and you won’t want to leave.